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9 posts in Centennial

Centennial Stories 9

Jeffrey Olsen (BS, 1981; PhD, 1999)
I received a BS degree from the College of Fisheries in 1981. At that time, rather than attempt graduate school, I pursued employment. I wanted to experience hands-on fish biology, so I spent a couple years on the seasonal circuit doing all kinds of field work from Washington State to Alaska. It was great! I got to work for fish biologists in field camps, sample and count juvenile and adult salmon, survey fishermen, and do remote eggtakes. 

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Centennial Stories 8

Bernie May (MS, 1975)
Returning to the UW after two years in the army, I completed my BS in the newly created major in Molecular Biology. During my last year, I attended a class in Fish Genetics taught by Bill Hershberger. Fred Allendorf (then an MS student) gave a guest lecture on the use of genetic data from allozyme electrophoresis to address questions in fisheries management. 

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Centennial Stories 7

Andrew Hendry (MS, 1995; PhD, 1998)
In 1991, when I walked out of my last final exam in my final year at the University of Victoria, I cold-called my intended PhD supervisor, Dr. Tom Quinn. I gave a long, reasonably well-prepared spiel about my passion for salmon and my desire to do graduate work in his lab. A modest silence followed my monologue and then a “Well, it sounds like you would make an excellent graduate student but, unfortunately, you missed the application deadline by six months.” Momentarily crushed, my enthusiasm recovered when he suggested that I come work for him over the fall. 

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Centennial Stories 6

Fred Allendorf (MS, 1973; PhD, Fisheries & Genetics, 1975)
I began graduate school at the College of Fisheries in 1971 after graduating from Penn State. I had worked in the genetics lab of Jim Wright at Penn State, and he recommended that I attend grad school at UW because a former student of his (Bill Hershberger) had recently joined the Fisheries faculty. 

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Centennial Stories 5

Standish (Stan) K. Allen, Jr (PhD, 1987)
I admit that my undergraduate experience was underwhelming. However, eventually (and fortunately) I found my way to the University of Maine to study for an MS degree in Zoology. In Maine, there were two seminal developments for my career: I discovered shellfish aquaculture and was fortuitously appointed as research assistant on a project to make triploid salmon. 

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Centennial Stories 4

John C. Field (PhD, 2004)
I began my fisheries career in Santa Cruz, California, when I took a night job as a deckhand on a local fishing boat while also taking a course in biological oceanography from the University of California Santa Cruz.  The course included a section on climate variability and the impact on fisheries resources, with a focus on the classic story of the rise and fall of both the California sardine fishery and the Peruvian anchoveta fishery.  

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Centennial Stories 3

Anne B. Hollowed (PhD 1990)
Throughout my career, I have been fortunate to have maintained close ties with SAFS. In 1990, I graduated from SAFS with a PhD, and found a position with the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Seattle.  This gave me the opportunity to witness the impact of SAFS on fisheries science throughout the world over the last 30 years. 

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Centennial Stories 2

William G. Clark (PhD, 1975)
In 1969, I had a degree in economics and mathematics from the University of Michigan, but what I really wanted to do was to go to graduate school and build computer models of marine ecosystems. I interviewed at a number of oceanography departments, and they all turned me down because I didn’t have any undergraduate credits in biology. 

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Centennial Stories 1

Dick Myhre (School of Fisheries, BS 1950)
I graduated from high school in 1939 and enlisted in the Washington National Guard in November of that year.  The National Guard was activated in September 1940 and that meant I was on active duty in the Army.  I received my Honorable Discharge in October 1945 and was able to attend the UW on the GI Bill.  

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