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Our students learn by doing

Our students engage in hands-on learning, in the classroom, in the lab and in the field. They are guided by faculty with specialties across multiple disciplines.

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we partner with all stakeholders

We work with regional, national and international groups to find science-based solutions that preserve aquatic systems and surrounding communities.

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Salmon Held

Our research addresses today’s challenges

We conduct basic and applied research using the newest tools and technology to address our changing climate and its impact on aquatic systems.

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Explore our Programs

SAFS students work alongside talented peers and faculty to engage in a rigorous and inclusive learning environment. Join us to connect with some of the best minds and immerse yourself in cutting-edge scientific research.

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Meet Our Faculty

Our faculty are committed leaders with broad academic expertise and interests. With access to a network of local, national and international leaders, we contribute influential research on topics ranging from organisms, populations, ecosystems, to human users of aquatic ecosystems.

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Boots in the Mud: A Summer with the Alaska Salmon Program

Students fly 1,777 miles northwest of Seattle and spend a month with the Alaska Salmon Program at their field stations on the banks of Lake Aleknagik and Lake Nerka. Part of the larger Wood River system, these lakes, their creeks, and the surrounding wilderness serve as a “living laboratory” where students are immersed in one of the most valuable salmon fisheries on the planet.

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Polar bears scavenge on the carcass of a dead bowhead whale that washed ashore on Wrangel Island in Chukotka, Russia.Chris Collins/Heritage Expeditions

Polar bears gorged on whale carcasses to survive past warm periods, but strategy won’t suffice as climate warms

A new study led by the University of Washington found that although dead whales are still valuable sources of fat and protein for some polar bears, this resource will likely not be enough to sustain most bear populations in the future when the Arctic becomes ice-free in summers, which is likely to occur by 2040 due to climate change. The results were published online Oct. 9 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

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Pinpointing the footprint of trawling fishing vessels on coastal shelves

In recent years there has been a growing debate about what proportion of the oceans is fished, with estimates ranging from well above 50% to just 4%. 

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