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Fueled by Floods

Along the Mekong River in Cambodia, UW researchers are racing to determine how hydropower dams will impact the supplies of rice and fish — and the communities who rely on them.

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Our students learn by doing

Our students engage in hands-on learning, in the classroom, in the lab and in the field. They are guided by faculty with specialties across multiple disciplines.

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We partner with all stakeholders

We work with regional, national and international groups to find science-based solutions that preserve aquatic systems and surrounding communities.

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Our research addresses today’s challenges

We conduct basic and applied research using the newest tools and technology to address our changing climate and its impact on aquatic systems.

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Explore our Programs

SAFS students work alongside talented peers and faculty to engage in a rigorous and inclusive learning environment. Join us to connect with some of the best minds and immerse yourself in cutting-edge scientific research.

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Meet Our Faculty

Our faculty are committed leaders with broad academic expertise and interests. With access to a network of local, national and international leaders, we contribute influential research on topics ranging from organisms, populations, ecosystems, to human users of aquatic ecosystems.

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Camrin Braun named new Assistant Professor

SAFS is excited to announce that Camrin Braun will be joining us as our newest Assistant Professor. 

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A Tunnel to the Twilight Zone: Blue sharks ride deep-swirling currents to the ocean’s midwater at mealtime

Last year, researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (UW) discovered that when white sharks are ready to feast, they ride large, swirling ocean currents known as eddies to fast-track their way to the ocean twilight zone—a layer of the ocean between 200 and 1000 meters deep (656 to 3280 feet) containing the largest fish biomass on Earth. Now, according to a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists are seeing a similar activity with blue sharks, which dive through these natural, spinning tunnels at mealtime. The eddies draw warm water deep into the twilight zone where temperatures are normally considerably colder, allowing blue sharks to forage across areas of the open ocean that are often characterized by low prey abundance in surface waters.

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Researchers deploy new tech to explore depths of Gulf of Mexico

A multi-institution team consisting of the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (UW SAFS) Professor John Horne will deploy experimental technology next week to explore the deep scattering layers of the ocean. 

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