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Our students learn by doing

Our students engage in hands-on learning, in the classroom, in the lab and in the field. They are guided by faculty with specialties across multiple disciplines.

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We partner with all stakeholders

We work with regional, national and international groups to find science-based solutions that preserve aquatic systems and surrounding communities.

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Our research addresses today’s challenges

We conduct basic and applied research using the newest tools and technology to address our changing climate and its impact on aquatic systems.

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Explore our Programs

SAFS students work alongside talented peers and faculty to engage in a rigorous and inclusive learning environment. Join us to connect with some of the best minds and immerse yourself in cutting-edge scientific research.

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Meet Our Faculty

Our faculty are committed leaders with broad academic expertise and interests. With access to a network of local, national and international leaders, we contribute influential research on topics ranging from organisms, populations, ecosystems, to human users of aquatic ecosystems.

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Exploring Our Watery World at UW’s Aquatic Science Open House

On May 4th, the University of Washington held its second annual Aquatic Science Open House. Seattle-area families, students, and teachers were invited to explore the institution’s marine and freshwater science programs and interact with researchers. The event was organized by the Students Explore Aquatic Sciences (SEAS) outreach group based in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS) and the Academic and Recreational Graduate Oceanographers (ARGO) outreach group based in the School of Oceanography.

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Fish swim along the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.

Tiny fishes fuel life on coral reefs

Coral reefs typically evoke clear, turquoise waters and a staggering number of colorful fishes. But what supports such an abundance of life?

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A spawning sockeye salmon looking at the camera underwater

Hot spots in rivers that nurture young salmon ‘flicker on and off’ in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region

Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska’s most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed.

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