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175 posts in Publications

Genomic resource development for shellfish of conservation concern.

Genomic resource development for shellfish of conservation concern.
Mol Ecol Resour. 2012 Dec 27;
Authors: Timmins-Schiffman EB, Friedman CS, Metzger DC, White SJ, Roberts SB
Abstract
Effective conservation of threatened species depends on the ability to assess organism physiology and population demography. To develop genomic resources to better understand the dynamics of two ecologically vulnerable species in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, larval transcriptomes were sequenced for the pinto abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana kamtschatkana, and the Olympia oyster, Ostrea lurida. 

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Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster

Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas
BMC Research Notes 2012, 5:502, DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-5-502
Authors: Timmins-Schiffman E, Roberts SB
Ceramide metabolism is an important part of the vertebrate response to a variety of environmental stressors.  Accumulation of ceramide, a lipid, can lead to stress-induced apoptosis.  We investigated the conservation of this pathway in invertebrates using the Pacific oyster as a model.   

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Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs.

Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Nov 28;
Authors: Naiman RJ, Alldredge JR, Beauchamp DA, Bisson PA, Congleton J, Henny CJ, Huntly N, Lamberson R, Levings C, Merrill EN, Pearcy WG, Rieman BE, Ruggerone GT, Scarnecchia D, Smouse PE, Wood CC
Abstract
Well-functioning food webs are fundamental for sustaining rivers as ecosystems and maintaining associated aquatic and terrestrial communities. 

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Rank and Order: Evaluating the Performance of SNPs for Individual Assignment in a Non-Model Organism.

Rank and Order: Evaluating the Performance of SNPs for Individual Assignment in a Non-Model Organism.
PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e49018
Authors: Storer CG, Pascal CE, Roberts SB, Templin WD, Seeb LW, Seeb JE
Abstract
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are valuable tools for ecological and evolutionary studies. In non-model species, the use of SNPs has been limited by the number of markers available. However, new technologies and decreasing technology costs have facilitated the discovery of a constantly increasing number of SNPs. 

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Coexistence and origin of trophic ecotypes of pygmy whitefish, Prosopium coulterii, in a south-western Alaskan lake

Coexistence and origin of trophic ecotypes of pygmy whitefish, Prosopium coulterii, in a south-western Alaskan lake
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, doi: 10.1111/jeb.12011
Authors: C. P. Gowell*†, T. P. Quinn† & E. B. Taylor‡
*Department of Biology, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, USA
†School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA
‡Department of Zoology, Biodiversity Research Centre and Beaty Biodiversity Museum, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
Abstract
Ecologically, morphologically and genetically distinct populations within single taxa often coexist in postglacial lakes and have provided important model systems with which to investigate ecological and evolutionary processes such as niche partitioning and ecological speciation. 

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Can interbreeding of wild and artificially propagated animals be prevented by using broodstock selected for a divergent life history?

Can interbreeding of wild and artificially propagated animals be prevented by using broodstock selected for a divergent life history?
Evol Appl. 2012 Nov;5(7):705-19
Authors: Seamons TR, Hauser L, Naish KA, Quinn TP
Abstract
TWO STRATEGIES HAVE BEEN PROPOSED TO AVOID NEGATIVE GENETIC EFFECTS OF ARTIFICIALLY PROPAGATED INDIVIDUALS ON WILD POPULATIONS: (i) integration of wild and captive populations to minimize domestication selection and (ii) segregation of released individuals from the wild population to minimize interbreeding. 

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Impacts of ocean acidification on marine seafood.

Impacts of ocean acidification on marine seafood.
Trends Ecol Evol. 2012 Nov 1;
Authors: Branch TA, Dejoseph BM, Ray LJ, Wagner CA
Abstract
Ocean acidification is a series of chemical reactions due to increased CO(2) emissions. The resulting lower pH impairs the senses of reef fishes and reduces their survival, and might similarly impact commercially targeted fishes that produce most of the seafood eaten by humans. 

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Elevated pCO2 causes developmental delay in early larval Pacific oysters

The paper, “Elevated pCO2 causes developmental delay in early larval Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas“, is included in an upcoming special issue on ocean acidification in the journal Marine Biology.  I did the research  in Emily Carrington’s lab in Friday Harbor during the summer of 2011 with the help of researcher Michael “Moose” O’Donnell.  Other co-authors and contributors are SAFS professors Carolyn Friedman and Steven Roberts.   

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Trade-offs in the design of fishery closures: management of silky shark bycatch in the eastern Pacific Ocean tuna fishery.

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Trade-offs in the design of fishery closures: management of silky shark bycatch in the eastern Pacific Ocean tuna fishery.
Conserv Biol. 2009 Jun;23(3):626-35
Authors: Watson JT, Essington TE, Lennert-Cody CE, Hall MA
Abstract
Bycatch–the incidental catch of nontarget species–is a principal concern in marine conservation and fisheries management. In the eastern Pacific Ocean tuna fishery, a large fraction of nonmammal bycatch is captured by purse-seine gear when nets are deployed around floating objects. 

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Synchronous Cycling of Ichthyophoniasis with Chinook Salmon Density Revealed during the Annual Yukon River Spawning Migration

Synchronous Cycling of Ichthyophoniasis with Chinook Salmon Density Revealed during the Annual Yukon River Spawning Migration
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, Volume 141, Issue 3, 2012
May 4, 2012
by Stanley Zuray, Richard Kocan & Paul Hershberger
Abstract
Populations of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Yukon River declined by more than 57% between 2003 and 2010, probably the result of a combination of anthropogenic and environmental factors. 

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