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Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously

With the help of new technologies, a team led by the University of Washington has confirmed that piranhas — and their plant-eating cousins, pacus — do in fact lose and regrow all the teeth on one side of their face multiple times throughout their lives. How they do it may help explain why the fish go to such efforts to replace their teeth.

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Hot Water: The intersection of culture, politics, and ecology in India

Ethen Whattam, an undergraduate student in the UW School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, recently returned from India, where he spent 10 months studying as a recipient of the Boren Scholarship. Whattam, along with the other student awardees, was given the opportunity to immerse himself in the Hindi language and culture, while researching a topic of his choice critical to U.S. national security interests. Defined broadly, the scope of national security allows for varying areas of research including public health, disease prevention, human trafficking, and in Whattam’s case, hydropolitics.

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Camrin Braun named new Assistant Professor

SAFS is excited to announce that Camrin Braun will be joining us as our newest Assistant Professor.

Camrin has worked on movement ecology of top predators and biophysical interactions in the ocean for nearly a decade. He recently finished his PhD in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography and has been working as a Postdoctoral Research Scientist in the Air-Sea Interaction and Remote Sensing Department at the Applied Physics Lab (APL-UW). 

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A Tunnel to the Twilight Zone: Blue sharks ride deep-swirling currents to the ocean’s midwater at mealtime

Last year, researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (UW) discovered that when white sharks are ready to feast, they ride large, swirling ocean currents known as eddies to fast-track their way to the ocean twilight zone—a layer of the ocean between 200 and 1000 meters deep (656 to 3280 feet) containing the largest fish biomass on Earth. Now, according to a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists are seeing a similar activity with blue sharks, which dive through these natural, spinning tunnels at mealtime. The eddies draw warm water deep into the twilight zone where temperatures are normally considerably colder, allowing blue sharks to forage across areas of the open ocean that are often characterized by low prey abundance in surface waters.

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