Filter Results

Whole DNA sequences should be used to improve conservation decisions

Rusty patched bumblebee (Bombus affinis; photo credit: Johanna James-Heinz), eastern massasauga rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus; photo credit: Nick Cairns), and willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii; photo credit: Kelly Colgan Azar)

The U.S. Endangered Species Act has saved or recovered many species, and is recognized as one of the most powerful laws in the world for protecting the environment. The primary aim of the Act is to ensure that populations and species persist, and to conserve genetic variation in population. But little attention is paid to the adaptive potential of populations—the capability of populations to evolve when faced with new selective pressures—even though new genetic methods of sequencing the entire DNA of organisms are now cheaper and easier than ever before. 

Read more

There are multiple ways of thinking about endangered species classification

To protect and recover species, most countries have laws that mandate particular actions when species are classified as threatened or endangered. These classifications can have an enormous impact on industries that impinge on the species in question, for example the declaration of northern spotted owls as endangered led to large-scale shutdowns in logging on old-growth forests. This process of classifying a species as threatened, endangered, or neither constitutes a difficult decision, and difficult decisions can usefully be approached using the theory and tools of decision analysis. 

Read more

Far smaller fishing footprint than previously believed

Effect of grid resolution on the perception of fishing footprint.

A new and more accurate study reveals that about 4% of the ocean area experiences fishing each year, a far smaller estimate than previous studies that relied on very large grid sizes. Two recent studies estimated that fishing takes place in 55% of the ocean and 90% of the ocean each year. But these estimates divide the ocean into 0.5°×0.5° grid cells, which are ~3100 km² in size at the equator, and assume each cell is fished if a single fishing location is recorded in the entire cell. 

Read more

Centennial Story 28

Toft Family

Jodie (PhD, 2009) and Jason (MS, 2000) Toft
“Um, Bob, so…have you ever wanted to be a minister?” So went the request one sunny afternoon at the Volunteer Park wading pool, while we were sitting with Bob Francis (professor emeritus) as he watched his grandson. A few months later, Bob officiated our wedding, sprinkling the ceremony and our path forward with his salt-of-the-earth gruff charm. 

Read more

Centennial Story 27

Scheuerell Family

Jennifer (MS, 2004) and Mark (Post-doc, 2003) Scheuerell
Jennifer and Mark came to SAFS by different routes.
Jennifer was born and raised in Bremerton, WA. She was fortunate to spend a lot of time sailing and SCUBA diving with her family and friends in Puget Sound. Much to her parents’ consternation, however, Jennifer spent her first year of college in Kenya, which offered her a rare opportunity to spend many months traveling around much of eastern and southern Africa. 

Read more

Centennial Story 26

Melissa banks of the Blanchard River

Melissa Haltuch (PhD, 2008) and Juan Valero (MS, 2001; PhD, 2011)
Melissa and Juan started their Aquatic and Fishery careers long before moving to Seattle from Ohio and Argentina, respectively, to add School and Sciences. They found much more than that at SAFS.
Melissa grew up on the shores of Lake Erie, doing undergraduate fieldwork on endangered freshwater mussels, subsequently completing her MS at The Ohio State University (OSU). 

Read more

Centennial Story 25

Ray & Marta at Vava'u Tonga in 2017

Raymond Buckley (BS, 1963; MS, 1969; PhD, 1997), Troy Buckley (BS, 1987; MS, 1995), Marta Gómez-Buckley (MS, 2000; PhD ongoing)
All in the (marine science) family
The Buckley/Gómez-Buckley family has a “score card” at SAFS that reads, BS – 2, MS – 3, PhD -1, with 1 PhD on the horizon. Ours is truly a family with adventures in marine science that over the years have ranged from the Arctic Ocean south to the Coral Sea, and from the Philippine Sea east to the Indian Ocean. 

Read more

Centennial Story 24

Safety first for Anne & Chris at Friday Harobr Labs

Anne Beaudreau (PhD, 2009) and Chris Sergeant (MS, 2004)
Love at First Fish
“Hey, what does your Leslie matrix look like?” Anne and I were already good friends and regular study buddies by my final quarter as a Master’s student in 2004. We shared mutual embarrassment when Don Gunderson looked over our shoulders and could barely hold back his disappointment as we struggled to fill in an age-structured Leslie matrix. 

Read more

The recovery of whooping cranes is threatened by black fly harassment

Photo of Whooping Crane

Whooping Cranes are highly endangered. To improve their recovery chances, a new migratory population was reintroduced into the wild in 2001, but their hatching success has been very low. A new study examines three possible hypotheses for this failure: harassment by black flies of nesting birds, effects of captive rearing, and inexperience of breeding birds. The overwhelming finding was that black fly harassment is the cause of poor hatching success: for example, when black fly numbers were reduced experimentally, breeding success doubled. 

Read more
Back to Top