Fully funded fall internships in Bermuda – NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates – APPLICATION DEADLINE MAY 30TH!

This email serves to announce that the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) has received funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program to support eight internships for undergraduate student research at BIOS during fall 2013.

This program provides recipients with the opportunity to conduct intensive, hands-on research projects in several active and ongoing research areas, including:

  • Biology, chemistry, and physics of the open ocean
  • Biology, physiology, and biochemistry of coral reef ecosystems
  • Molecular biology of marine organisms
  • Environmental chemistry of Bermuda’s atmosphere and inshore waters
  • Effects and consequences of global environmental change

Further information on the REU program at BIOS can be found here: www.bios.edu/education/reu/ This includes a list of past projects and student testimonials and links to the application form, an overview of the REU Program at BIOS, student publications and potential BIOS mentors.

We also operate a Facebook page where you can meet and mingle with former and prospective REU interns, see photos of them conducting their research, read their testimonials, meet the advisers and find out more about BIOS and Bermuda in general: http://www.facebook.com/BIOS.REU

Eligibility and Terms of Fellowship

To apply you will need to fill out the application form, choose three mentors that you are interested in working with, provide up to date transcripts, your current CV and two letters of reference. The application deadline is May 30th, 2013. Please email applications to education

Applicants must meet the following criteria:-

· Completed at least one year of undergraduate study

· Will still be an undergraduate in the fall of 2013

· U.S. citizen or permanent resident

Minorities are especially encouraged to submit applications. Students will reside on the BIOS campus. The REU Program covers travel expenses, room and board. Travel insurance is the responsibility of the student. Each successful REU applicant will receive a stipend paid at competitive rates. BIOS encourages all successful applicants to arrange for independent study credit through their home institutions.

We look forward to receiving applications!

Chloé Newcomb Hodgetts

Education Coordinator

Potential projects for 2013 include:

Adviser Lab Website Project Description Experience Required
Dr Andrew Peters http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/eqp/ Marine Chemistry: Bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons from weathered oil deposits in Bermuda’s littoral zone. Tar deposits arising from marine oil spills in the 1970’s and 1980’s will be collected from rocky shorelines and the release of petroleum hydrocarbons to clean seawater will be assessed in a series of laboratory experiments. Hydrocarbons in the seawater will be measured using SPME GC-MS. Organic chemstry classes (theory and lab) essential. Experience with using GC-MS an asset.
http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/eqp/ Atmospheric Chemistry: Investigation of major ion chemistry of rainwater and aerosol in the sub-tropical marine atmosphere. Various projects available. Chemistry classes (theory and lab) essential.
Rachel Parsons http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/oceanic-microbial-observatory/ Determining the temporal and spatial changes of Archaea in the open ocean: Using microscopy and molecular techniques to look at changes in archaeal abundance over time and depth using the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study. Analyses: DAPI Counts (microbial enumeration), PCR, CARD-FISH Basic molecular and microscopy skills, good chemistry knowledge and familiarity with Excel, Word and Powerpoint.
http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/oceanic-microbial-observatory/ Looking at antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with the Seabright sewage outfall: Using PCR and qPCR to look at Staphylococcus aureus vs methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus levels in hospital sewage. Whether this organism is making its way into the marine environment via the Seabright sewage outfall. Analyses: PCR, qPCR, culture methods Basic molecular skills, good chemistry knowledge and familiarity with Excel, Word and Powerpoint.
http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/oceanic-microbial-observatory/ Microbe -Coral interactions: How corals and microbes interact specifically determining if corals can change the microbial community to select for species that are beneficial for nutrition. Analyses: DAPI Counts (microbe enumeration), PCR, T-RFLP, FISH and CARD-FISH, Bacterial Production, Aquaria Experiments Basic molecular and microscopy skills, good chemistry knowledge and familiarity with Excel, Word and Powerpoint.
Natasha McDonald http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/bbop/ Investigation of the sources and sinks of lignin phenols in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) as a proxy for terrestrially derived organic matter: Combining atmospheric chemistry and oceanography to determine the flux of these compounds from the atmosphere into the open ocean. Analyses: High volume air sampling; Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectometry; UV-Vis Absorbance Spectroscopy; Participation in research cruises. Chemistry skills (theory + lab experience). Basic proficiency in data processing. Skills in atmospheric/marine/environmental science and proficiency in Matlab a bonus.
http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/bbop/ Determination of the affect of microbial activity on the chemical composition of lignin phenols: how does bacteria from open ocean waters decompose or otherwise chemically alter various lignin fractions. Analyses: Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectometry; UV-Vis Absorbance Spectroscopy; Solid phase extraction; Participation in research cruises. Chemistry skills (theory + lab experience). Basic proficiency in data processing. Skills in atmospheric/marine/environmental science, microbiology and proficiency in Matlab a bonus.
http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/bbop/ Analysis of spectral slope ratios in absorbance data for Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM): to better understand links between CDOM sprectroscopy and chemical compostion/source. Analyses: Data analysis/processing of spectroscopy data. Proficiency in data analysis. Profiency in Matlab or comparable analytical software. Profiency in statistical analysis and data modeling.
Dr Eric Hochberg http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/creol/ Reef Community Light-Use Efficiency: How efficient are corals and algae at absorbing light and using it in photosynthesis? How does the efficiency change when the organisms are stressed? The answers are fundamental to reef ecosystem function. This project will involve lab-based experiments to determine light-use efficiencies for different functional groups of reef benthos (i.e., corals, various algae, sediment). This will entail collecting specimens, placing them in an outdoor recirculating flume mesocosm, and measuring changes in dissolved oxygen (using an automated sensor) to determine their rates of photosynthesis. There will be some opportunity to conduct field observations on the natural reefs of Bermuda, as well. Science background, with intro physics, chemistry, and math, ideally with upper-level biology; SCUBA certification, if diving is to be included in project
http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/creol/ Phenology of Coral Pigments: Phenology is the study of life cycle events and how they are influenced by seasons, climate, etc. While coral bleaching is well studied, coral pigment phenology under non-stress conditions is poorly understood. The work in this project will be lab-based, involving daily observations of coral pigmentation using bio-optical methods. Some coral tissue samples will be analyzed for pigment concentrations to validate the bio-optical approach. There will be some opportunity to conduct field observations as well. Science background, with intro physics, chemistry, and math, ideally with upper-level biology; SCUBA certification, if diving is to be included in project
Dr Helena Reinardy http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/molecular-discovery/ DNA damage and repair in marine echinoderms: The capacity to repair DNA damage is critical for cell health and prevention of disease such as cancer. Some marine organisms (e.g. sea urchins) have very low rates of cancer development as well as being highly resistant to genotoxicants. DNA repair activity in marine organisms is poorly understood, and this project will compare DNA repair activity among different species of sea urchin after exposure to different types of genotoxicants including UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide. Techniques will include specimen collection, good molecular biology laboratory practice, DNA damage and repair assays. Science background, especially biology and mathematics, good laboratory skills, proficiency with data processing and analysis, interest in applied marine biology and molecular techniques.
Drs Helena Reinardy and Kristen Buck http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/molecular-discovery/ http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/trace-metal/ Genotoxic effects of environmental copper contamination in Bermuda:Copper is a known environmental contaminant in Bermuda waters and one possible source is from marine anti-fouling paints. Copper is known to be toxic to aquatic organisms, but it is not known what the potential ecotoxicological impacts are of copper exposure in Bermuda. This project will investigate the eco- and geno-toxicology of environmentally relevant sources and concentrations of copper using the sea urchin larvae ecotoxicological model. Techniques will include sea urchin fertilization, rearing and husbandry of sea urchin larvae, genotoxicology assays, and analytical chemistry of copper in water, sediments, and bioaccumulation in sea urchin larvae. Science background, especially biology, chemistry, and mathematics, good laboratory skills, proficiency with data processing and analysis, interest in ecotoxicology, environmental chemistry, and molecular biology techniques.
Dr Kristen Buck http://www.bios.edu/research/projects/trace-metal/ Trace metals absorbed on and contained within macroalgal Sargassum species found in Bermuda waters: As Sargassum is transported to the Sargasso Sea and Bermuda from the Gulf of Mexico, it may serve as a vector for trace metals to the island. This study will provide preliminary data on Cu, Ni, and Zn concentrations associated with Sargassum in local waters. Analyses: EDTA wash, strong acid digestions, GFAAS analyses. Strong chemistry skills, comfort working with strong acids (nitric acid), ideally experience working with trace metal clean techniques- otherwise strong attention to detail and meticulous behavior in a laboratory setting. Familiarity with Excel, Word and Powerpoint.
Dr Ruth Curry http://www.whoi.edu/science/po/people/rcurry Climate change and the Atlantic Ocean: A global database of observed hydrographic profiles of pressure, temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and tracers (HydroBase3) provides a powerful tool for investigating ocean properties and how they are changing with time. This project will update the database with recently acquired Argo float and CTD profiles and utilize them to: 1) quantify changes in ocean heat and freshwater content on regional scales, and 2) investigate changes in the North Atlantic gyre circulation over the last 60 years. Strong science and math background, computer skills (will use Linux and Matlab software tools) and curiosity about the nature of ocean circulation and its role in the climate system.

Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS)

17 Biological Station, St. George’s GE 01, Bermuda

T 441 297 1880 x115

www.bios.edu

http://www.facebook.com/BIOS.REU

BIOS, founded in 1903 as the Bermuda Biological Station, is an independent U.S.not-for-profit organization and Bermuda Registered Charity committed to ocean science for human good.

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