92 posts in News

SAFS in the News: Conservation not an effective tool for reducing infectious disease in people, study finds

SAFS professor Chelsea Wood is featured in UW Today:
‘“There are a lot of great reasons for conservation, but control of infectious disease isn’t one of them,” said lead author and parasite ecologist Chelsea Wood, an assistant professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. “We’re not going to improve public health by pushing a single button. 

SAFS students honored with Husky 100 Award

Each year, the Husky 100 recognizes 100 UW undergraduate and graduate students from Bothell, Seattle and Tacoma in all areas of study who are making the most of their time at the UW.
In 2017, three SAFS students were honored with the Husky 100 award:
Jonathan (Jono) Grindall, undergraduate senior
Griffin Hoins, undergraduate senior
Daniel Hernandez, graduate (PhD)
Congratulations to Jonathan, Griffin, and Daniel! 

SAFS in the News: Livable City Year

SAFS undergraduate student Ariel Delos Santos is featured on the UW website:
‘Senior Ariel Delos Santos was one of the students in Born’s fall class which looked at connectivity and community place-making in Auburn.
“Working with the LCY program brought a novel component to our educational experience. Instead of a standard classroom setting where our homework is only seen by the professor, our final products were intimately tied to the city and its community members – which greatly motivated us to do more work and be more attentive to those who will be affected,” said Delos Santos, a senior double major in Community, Environment & Planning and Aquatic Fishery & Sciences. 

SAFS in the News: ‘Black swan’ events strike animal populations

SAFS postdoctoral researcher Sean Anderson and SAFS professor Trevor Branch are featured in UW Today:
‘Black swan events are rare and surprising occurrences that happen without notice and often wreak havoc on society. The metaphor has been used to describe banking collapses, devastating earthquakes and other major surprises in financial, social and natural systems.
A new analysis by the University of Washington and Simon Fraser University is the first to document that black swan events also occur in animal populations and usually manifest as massive, unexpected die-offs. 

SAFS in the News: UW’s Kristin Laidre awarded Pew marine fellowship to study effects of climate change, subsistence hunting on polar bears

SAFS professor Kristin Laidre is featured in UW Today:
‘Polar bears depend on sea ice for essential tasks like hunting and breeding. As Arctic sea ice disappears due to climate change, bears across the species’ 19 subpopulations are feeling the strain.
But even as scientists try to quantify just how much melting sea ice is affecting polar bears, another group that depends on the iconic mammal for subsistence also is at risk of losing an important nutritional and economic resource. 

SAFS in the News: Winners, losers among fish when landscape undergoes change

SAFS professor Julian Olden is featured in UW Today:
‘As humans build roads, construct buildings and develop land for agriculture, freshwater ecosystems respond ― but not always in the ways one might expect.
A new study by the University of Washington and Simon Fraser University finds that some fish lose out while others benefit as urban and agricultural development encroaches on streams and rivers across the United States. 

SAFS in the News: Faculty Friday with Tim Essington

The Whole U Faculty Friday series features SAFS professor Tim Essington:
‘To deliver the perfect presentation, prepare to embrace your mistakes.
That’s the philosophy Tim Essington brings to Applied Improvisation for Science Communication, a course the professor of aquatic and fishery sciences developed to help scientists more confidently and effectively communicate their research.
“Giving a good talk isn’t just what you put on your slides, it’s conveying a story about your research,” Essington says. 

SAFS in the News: Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior

SAFS post-doc Rachel Hovel and SAFS professor Tom Quinn are featured in UW Today:
‘One of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change. This could impact the ecology of northern lakes, which already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate.
That’s the main finding of a recent University of Washington study published in Global Change Biology that analyzed reproductive patterns of three-spine stickleback fish over half a century in Alaska’s Bristol Bay region. 

SAFS in the News: Diversification key to resilient fishing communities

SAFS grad Timothy Cline and SAFS professors Daniel Schindler and Ray Hilborn are featured in UW Today:
‘Fishing communities can survive ― and even thrive ― as fish abundance and market prices shift if they can catch a variety of species and nimbly move from one fishery to the next.
These findings, published Jan. 16 in Nature Communications, draw upon 34 years of data collected in more than 100 fishing communities in Alaska that depend on fishing for livelihoods, cultural traditions and daily subsistence. 

SAFS in the News: Ocean acidification to hit West Coast Dungeness crab fishery

SAFS Prof. Tim Essington is featured in UW Today:
‘The acidification of the ocean expected as seawater absorbs increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will reverberate through the West Coast’s marine food web, but not necessarily in the ways you might expect, new research shows.
Dungeness crabs, for example, will likely suffer as their food sources decline. Dungeness crab fisheries valued at about $220 million annually may face a strong downturn over the next 50 years, according to the research published Jan. 

Back to Top