98 posts in News

SAFS in the News: Climate change challenges the survival of fish across the world

SAFS professor Julian Olden and postdoctoral researcher Lise Comte are featured in UW Today:
‘Climate change will force many amphibians, mammals and birds to move to cooler areas outside their normal ranges, provided they can find space and a clear trajectory among our urban developments and growing cities.
But what are the chances for fish to survive as climate change continues to warm waters around the world? 

SAFS in the News: Decoding coral DNA could help save reefs from extinction

SAFS grad student James Dimond is featured on UPI Science News:
‘Marine biologist Ruth Gates sat down in an oversize wooden rocking chair at an oceanside resort here last week to talk about the next frontier in coral science and a new hope for saving coral reefs reeling from climate change: genetic technology.
“There are hundreds of species of coral, all with complex biologies and physiological traits that vary based on their DNA and environment,” Gates, director of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, said while seated on a sprawling lanai overlooking acres of coral reefs awash in turquoise waters. 

SAFS in the News: Scientists to create digital encyclopedia of 3-D vertebrate specimens

SAFS professors Luke Tornabene and Adam Summers are featured in UW Today:
‘A $2.5 million National Science Foundation grant will daylight thousands of specimens from their museum shelves by CT scanning 20,000 vertebrates and making these data-rich, 3-D images available online to researchers, educators, students and the public.
The project oVert, short for openVertebrate, complements other NSF-sponsored museum digitization efforts, such as iDigBio, by adding a crucial component that has been difficult to capture — the internal anatomy of specimens. 

SAFS in the News: Faculty Friday with Luke Tornabene

SAFS professor Luke Tornabene is profiled in the Whole U’s Faculty Friday:
‘Luke Tornabene hovers above the abyss, suspended somewhere between fathomless darkness and daylight, 800 feet above. A layer of condensation has formed on the interior of the five-person submersible—the product of warm air within the cockpit interacting with increasingly cold water without as the research vessel slips ever deeper into the dusk-colored Caribbean waters somewhere off the coast of Curacao. 

SAFS in the News: Look, It’s a Dead Mole Inside a Fish’s Mouth

SAFS professors Daniel Schindler and Trevor Branch and SAFS alum Peter Lisi are featured in Motherboard:
‘Wow, cool.

Nothing on the internet shocks me anymore. But seeing a fully-formed mole inside a fish’s mouth made me think, “Hmmm, yeah. I guess that’s kind of gross.”…
“Largemouth bass [like the one Mackinney caught] are particularly well-known for eating small mammals of various types. 

SAFS in the News: The New York Times recognizes UW student policy recommendations

SAFS graduate student Eleni Petrou is featured in UW Today:
‘In 2015, a harmful algal bloom damaged ecosystems, communities and economies across the U.S. West Coast. Fisheries essential to local economies faced long-term closures to protect human health. Marine life suffered mass die-offs. Climate change makes recurrent events likely, but there is little assurance that public policy will better support our communities and environment the next time. 

SAFS in the News: Conservation not an effective tool for reducing infectious disease in people, study finds

SAFS professor Chelsea Wood is featured in UW Today:
‘“There are a lot of great reasons for conservation, but control of infectious disease isn’t one of them,” said lead author and parasite ecologist Chelsea Wood, an assistant professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington. “We’re not going to improve public health by pushing a single button. 

SAFS students honored with Husky 100 Award

Each year, the Husky 100 recognizes 100 UW undergraduate and graduate students from Bothell, Seattle and Tacoma in all areas of study who are making the most of their time at the UW.
In 2017, three SAFS students were honored with the Husky 100 award:
Jonathan (Jono) Grindall, undergraduate senior
Griffin Hoins, undergraduate senior
Daniel Hernandez, graduate (PhD)
Congratulations to Jonathan, Griffin, and Daniel! 

SAFS in the News: Livable City Year

SAFS undergraduate student Ariel Delos Santos is featured on the UW website:
‘Senior Ariel Delos Santos was one of the students in Born’s fall class which looked at connectivity and community place-making in Auburn.
“Working with the LCY program brought a novel component to our educational experience. Instead of a standard classroom setting where our homework is only seen by the professor, our final products were intimately tied to the city and its community members – which greatly motivated us to do more work and be more attentive to those who will be affected,” said Delos Santos, a senior double major in Community, Environment & Planning and Aquatic Fishery & Sciences. 

SAFS in the News: ‘Black swan’ events strike animal populations

SAFS postdoctoral researcher Sean Anderson and SAFS professor Trevor Branch are featured in UW Today:
‘Black swan events are rare and surprising occurrences that happen without notice and often wreak havoc on society. The metaphor has been used to describe banking collapses, devastating earthquakes and other major surprises in financial, social and natural systems.
A new analysis by the University of Washington and Simon Fraser University is the first to document that black swan events also occur in animal populations and usually manifest as massive, unexpected die-offs. 

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