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40 posts in SAFS News

Virtual Spring Seminars

Join us for our virtual Spring Seminar Series, Thursday’s this quarter, from 4:00-6:00 pm PT on Zoom

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, many of our planned speakers have graciously agreed to present virtually this quarter. We hope you can join us for these important talks and use the opportunity to connect with your colleagues and classmates. A tentative schedule can be found below and on our events page. 

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SAFS Hosts SeaDoc Society Educator Workshop

The University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences recently hosted the SeaDoc Society and its Explore the Salish Sea Educator Workshop with the goal of working with King County-area teachers to meet Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by incorporating local Salish Sea issues and topics into their classrooms.

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Mark your Calendars for the 2020 Bevan Series on Sustainable Fisheries

The annual Bevan Series on Sustainable Fisheries is right around the corner! This year’s series will focus on freshwater fisheries and ecosystem services. Be sure to view our events page and hit the + to subscribe and have information about each week’s presentation automatically added to your calendar.
Presentations will also be recorded and uploaded to our SAFS YouTube channel. If you missed any of our 2019 Bevan/SAFS Centennial or Autumn Seminar presentations they can be viewed there as well. 

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Precision mapping with satellite, drone photos could help predict infections of a widespread tropical disease

A team led by the University of Washington and Stanford University has discovered clues in the environment that help identify transmission hotspots for schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that is second only to malaria in its global health impact. The research, publishing the week of Oct. 28 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses rigorous field sampling and aerial images to precisely map communities that are at greatest risk for schistosomiasis.

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Camrin Braun named new Assistant Professor

SAFS is excited to announce that Camrin Braun will be joining us as our newest Assistant Professor.

Camrin has worked on movement ecology of top predators and biophysical interactions in the ocean for nearly a decade. He recently finished his PhD in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography and has been working as a Postdoctoral Research Scientist in the Air-Sea Interaction and Remote Sensing Department at the Applied Physics Lab (APL-UW). 

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A Tunnel to the Twilight Zone: Blue sharks ride deep-swirling currents to the ocean’s midwater at mealtime

Last year, researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (UW) discovered that when white sharks are ready to feast, they ride large, swirling ocean currents known as eddies to fast-track their way to the ocean twilight zone—a layer of the ocean between 200 and 1000 meters deep (656 to 3280 feet) containing the largest fish biomass on Earth. Now, according to a new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists are seeing a similar activity with blue sharks, which dive through these natural, spinning tunnels at mealtime. The eddies draw warm water deep into the twilight zone where temperatures are normally considerably colder, allowing blue sharks to forage across areas of the open ocean that are often characterized by low prey abundance in surface waters.

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