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19 posts in Centennial

Centennial Story 19

Alexandre N. Zerbini (PhD, 2006)
It all started on a warm morning in the summer on the beach in my home country of Brazil when I was about 10 years old. I went for a walk with my father and three brothers when we came across a dead dolphin. It was a franciscana (scientifically known as Pontoporia blainvillei), one of the smallest cetaceans, and a species endemic to the western South Atlantic Ocean. 

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Centennial Story 18

Josh London (PhD, 2006)
The University of Washington seemed like an odd choice for a kid from Tulsa, Oklahoma. However, after a visit to Seattle and the Pacific Northwest, I knew where I wanted to be. And, even though I was initially not accepted, the UW became home for nearly 15 years. And, Seattle has been home for 25 years.
As a freshman, I signed up for the wildlife science program in the College of Forest Resources. 

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Centennial Story 17

Donna Hauser (BS, 2003; MS, 2006; PhD, 2016)
I grew up in Alaska, with wilderness always at my fingertips and primed to study marine biology from my first undergraduate days at UW. Yet the transition to Seattle’s urban environment was challenging until I found a home at SAFS, where professors knew your name, your classmates were your allies, and learning was by experience. 

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Centennial Story 16

Amanda L. Bradford (MS, 2003; PhD, 2011)
I didn’t start off a “dolphin hugger,” as they say in the field of marine mammal science, but rather came to appreciate the unique anatomical, physiological, behavioral, and ecological adaptations of marine mammals while pursuing my BS in Marine Biology at Texas A&M University at Galveston. There, I had an incredible mentor, Dr. Bernd Würsig, who was both world-renowned in this field and extremely supportive of students. 

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Centennial Story 15

Chang-Ik Zhang (PhD, 1987)
Chang-Ik Zhang started his studies at the University of Washington in 1981 and received a PhD in fisheries under Donald Gunderson in 1987. During his UW graduate studies, he received the Ellis Memorial Scholarship and the Anderson Memorial Scholarship. He was on the Dean’s List for 1985–1986 due to his academic achievements at UW. While a graduate student, he worked with classmates, Patrick Sullivan, now a professor at Cornell University, and Anne Hollowed, now at NOAA/Fisheries, writing scientific papers for publication and discussing scientific issues. 

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Centennial Story 14

Suam Kim (PhD, 1987)
Suam Kim received his B.Sc (1976) and M.Sc. (1979) in the Department of Oceanography from the Seoul National University (Republic of Korea) and his PhD in fisheries oceanography in the School of Fisheries (now SAFS) in 1987. His main research interest at the UW, conducted in collaboration with scientists at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center, was the recruitment process for walleye pollock in the Gulf of Alaska. 

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Centennial Story 13

Martin Hall (PhD, 1983)
After graduating in Marine Biology from the University of Buenos Aires, I went to Patagonia to conduct research. My main interests were the management of the natural resources of the area, and I became involved in several projects. I realized that my training was not the right one to produce solid scientific answers to the questions of how much could be harvested sustainably and other issues relevant to most developing countries. 

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Centennial Story 12

Ximing Guo (MS, 1987; PhD, 1991)
I began graduate school at the School of Fisheries in 1985, after receiving a BS degree from Shandong College of Oceanography (now Ocean University of China). My decision to join UW was influenced by Lauren “Doc” Donaldson, whom I had the fortune to meet in Qingdao. Donaldson, a legendary fish geneticist who developed the famous “Donaldson Trout,” introduced UW to me and encouraged me to come. 

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Centennial Story 11

Vera Agostini (PhD, 2005)
I came to the PhD program at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Science from Rome, Italy, my birthplace. After a handful of years teaching on schooners with the Sea Education Association, and starting to learn the tricks of the trade as a visiting scientist with the Fisheries Department of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, I decided it was time to get some good grounding in fishery science. 

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Centennial Story 10

Sara Adlerstein-Gonzalez (MS, 1987; PhD, 1992)
My years at the University of Washington are among the best in my life; I was not the best student, but I must have been the happiest! I joined the MS program with a Chilean government scholarship, poised to obtain expertise in stock assessment and to go back to my job at the Undersecretary of Fisheries. 

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