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Fish species introductions provide novel insights into the patterns and drivers of phylogenetic structure in freshwaters.

Fish species introductions provide novel insights into the patterns and drivers of phylogenetic structure in freshwaters.
Proc Biol Sci. 2014;281(1778):20133003
Authors: Strecker AL, Olden JD
Abstract
Despite long-standing interest of terrestrial ecologists, freshwater ecosystems are a fertile, yet unappreciated, testing ground for applying community phylogenetics to uncover mechanisms of species assembly. We quantify phylogenetic clustering and overdispersion of native and non-native fishes of a large river basin in the American Southwest to test for the mechanisms (environmental filtering versus competitive exclusion) and spatial scales influencing community structure. 

Gyrodactylid Ectoparasites in a Population of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

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Gyrodactylid Ectoparasites in a Population of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).
J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2014;53(1):92-7
Authors: Garcia RL, Hansen AG, Chan MM, Sanders GE
Abstract
A colony of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a decentralized aquatic animal facility was noted to have an increase in morbidity and mortality (from 4 or 5 fish each month to 3 or 4 fish daily) approximately 2 wk after experimental procedures began. 

Opportunistic exploitation: an overlooked pathway to extinction.

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Opportunistic exploitation: an overlooked pathway to extinction.
Trends Ecol Evol. 2013 Jul;28(7):409-13
Authors: Branch TA, Lobo AS, Purcell SW
Abstract
How can species be exploited economically to extinction? Past single-species hypotheses examining the economic plausibility of exploiting rare species have argued that the escalating value of rarity allows extinction to be profitable. We describe an alternative pathway toward extinction in multispecies exploitation systems, termed ‘opportunistic exploitation’. 

Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Authors: Wesley A. Larson, Lisa W. Seeb, Meredith V. Everett, Ryan K. Waples, William D. Templin, James E. Seeb. All authors but William D. Templin are from SAFS.

Here is a link to the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/eva.12128/suppinfo

Abstract

Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. 

Species- and community-level responses combine to drive phenology of lake phytoplankton.

Species- and community-level responses combine to drive phenology of lake phytoplankton.
Ecology. 2013 Oct;94(10):2188-94
Authors: Walters AW, González Sagrario Mde L, Schindler DE
Abstract
Global change is leading to shifts in the seasonal timing of growth and maturation for primary producers. Remote sensing is increasingly used to measure the timing of primary production in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, but there is often a poor correlation between these results and direct observations of life-history responses of individual species. 

Proposed changes to the nomenclature of Ichthyophonus sp. life stages and structures.

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Proposed changes to the nomenclature of Ichthyophonus sp. life stages and structures.
J Parasitol. 2013 Oct;99(5):906-9
Authors: Kocan RM
Abstract
Much of the terminology describing Ichthyophonus sp. life stages and structures can be traced to the mistaken classification of this organism as a fungus. This misidentification led early investigators to use mycological terms for the structures they observed; while some terminology is not so easily explained, it appears to have been co-opted from the fields of botany and bacteriology. 

Isotopic evidence and consequences of the role of microbes in macroalgae detritus-based food webs

Isotopic evidence and consequences of the role of microbes in macroalgae detritus-based food webs

Elizabeth A. Sosik, Charles A. Simenstad
School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA
Vol. 494: 107–119, 2013
doi: 10.3354/meps10544
ABSTRACT
Deep subtidal coastal food webs are increasingly a focus among coastal researchers, largely due to the reliance of these systems on subsidies of organic detritus donated from allochthonous sources. 

Predominant intragenic methylation is associated with gene expression characteristics in a bivalve mollusc.

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Predominant intragenic methylation is associated with gene expression characteristics in a bivalve mollusc.
PeerJ. 2013;1:e215
Authors: Gavery MR, Roberts SB
Abstract
Characterization of DNA methylation patterns in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, indicates that this epigenetic mechanism plays an important functional role in gene regulation and may be involved in the regulation of developmental processes and environmental responses. However, previous studies have been limited to in silico analyses or characterization of DNA methylation at the single gene level. 

Diel horizontal migration in streams: juvenile fish exploit spatial heterogeneity in thermal and trophic resources.

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Diel horizontal migration in streams: juvenile fish exploit spatial heterogeneity in thermal and trophic resources.
Ecology. 2013 Sep;94(9):2066-75
Authors: Armstrong JB, Schindler DE, Ruff CP, Brooks GT, Bentley KE, Torgersen CE
Abstract
Vertical heterogeneity in the physical characteristics of lakes and oceans is ecologically salient and exploited by a wide range of taxa through diel vertical migration to enhance their growth and survival. 

Size selectivity of predation by brown bears depends on the density of their sockeye salmon prey.

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Size selectivity of predation by brown bears depends on the density of their sockeye salmon prey.
Am Nat. 2013 May;181(5):663-73
Authors: Cunningham CJ, Ruggerone GT, Quinn TP
Abstract
Can variation in prey density drive changes in the intensity or direction of selective predation in natural systems? Despite ample evidence of density-dependent selection, the influence of prey density on predatory selection patterns has seldom been investigated empirically. 

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