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186 posts in Publications

Diversity of movements by individual anadromous coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii.

Diversity of movements by individual anadromous coastal cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii.
J Fish Biol. 2013 Nov;83(5):1161-82
Authors: Goetz FA, Baker B, Buehrens T, Quinn TP
Abstract
Wild, downstream-migrating cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii, smolts and adults were captured at a weir in Big Beef Creek, Hood Canal, Washington, surgically implanted with acoustic tags and tracked to identify spring and summer movements using stationary receivers in order to test the assumption that the species moves little while in marine waters. 

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Integrating scientific guidance into marine spatial planning.

Integrating scientific guidance into marine spatial planning.
Proc Biol Sci. 2014;281(1781):20132252
Authors: Rassweiler A, Costello C, Hilborn R, Siegel DA
Abstract
Marine spatial planning (MSP), whereby areas of the ocean are zoned for different uses, has great potential to reduce or eliminate conflicts between competing management goals, but only if strategically applied. The recent literature overwhelmingly agrees that including stakeholders in these planning processes is critical to success; but, given the countless alternative ways even simple spatial regulations can be configured, how likely is it that a stakeholder-driven process will generate plans that deliver on the promise of MSP? 

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Evolution of age and length at maturation of Alaskan salmon under size-selective harvest.

Evolution of age and length at maturation of Alaskan salmon under size-selective harvest.
Evol Appl. 2014 Feb;7(2):313-22
Authors: Kendall NW, Dieckmann U, Heino M, Punt AE, Quinn TP
Abstract
Spatial and temporal trends and variation in life-history traits, including age and length at maturation, can be influenced by environmental and anthropogenic processes, including size-selective exploitation. Spawning adults in many wild Alaskan sockeye salmon populations have become shorter at a given age over the past half-century, but their age composition has not changed. 

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Genetic and morphometric divergence in threespine stickleback in the Chignik catchment, Alaska.

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Genetic and morphometric divergence in threespine stickleback in the Chignik catchment, Alaska.
Ecol Evol. 2014 Jan;4(2):144-56
Authors: Taugbøl A, Junge C, Quinn TP, Herland A, Vøllestad LA
Abstract
Divergent selection pressures induced by different environmental conditions typically lead to variation in life history, behavior, and morphology. When populations are locally adapted to their current environment, selection may limit movement into novel sites, leading to neutral and adaptive genetic divergence in allopatric populations. 

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Injuries from non-retention in gillnet fisheries suppress reproductive maturation in escaped fish.

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Injuries from non-retention in gillnet fisheries suppress reproductive maturation in escaped fish.
PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e69615
Authors: Baker MR, Swanson P, Young G
Abstract
Exploitation of fisheries resources has unintended consequences, not only in the bycatch and discard of non-target organisms, but also in damage to targeted fish that are injured by gear but not landed (non-retention). Delayed mortality due to non-retention represents lost reproductive potential in exploited stocks, while not contributing to harvest. 

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An Inherited Magnetic Map Guides Ocean Navigation in Juvenile Pacific Salmon.

An Inherited Magnetic Map Guides Ocean Navigation in Juvenile Pacific Salmon.
Curr Biol. 2014 Feb 5;
Authors: Putman NF, Scanlan MM, Billman EJ, O’Neil JP, Couture RB, Quinn TP, Lohmann KJ, Noakes DL
Abstract
Migratory marine animals exploit resources in different oceanic regions at different life stages, but how they navigate to specific oceanic areas is poorly understood [1-3]. A particular challenge is explaining how juvenile animals with no prior migratory experience are able to locate specific oceanic feeding habitats that are hundreds or thousands of kilometers from their natal sites [1-7]. 

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Fish species introductions provide novel insights into the patterns and drivers of phylogenetic structure in freshwaters.

Fish species introductions provide novel insights into the patterns and drivers of phylogenetic structure in freshwaters.
Proc Biol Sci. 2014;281(1778):20133003
Authors: Strecker AL, Olden JD
Abstract
Despite long-standing interest of terrestrial ecologists, freshwater ecosystems are a fertile, yet unappreciated, testing ground for applying community phylogenetics to uncover mechanisms of species assembly. We quantify phylogenetic clustering and overdispersion of native and non-native fishes of a large river basin in the American Southwest to test for the mechanisms (environmental filtering versus competitive exclusion) and spatial scales influencing community structure. 

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Gyrodactylid Ectoparasites in a Population of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

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Gyrodactylid Ectoparasites in a Population of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).
J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2014;53(1):92-7
Authors: Garcia RL, Hansen AG, Chan MM, Sanders GE
Abstract
A colony of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a decentralized aquatic animal facility was noted to have an increase in morbidity and mortality (from 4 or 5 fish each month to 3 or 4 fish daily) approximately 2 wk after experimental procedures began. 

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Opportunistic exploitation: an overlooked pathway to extinction.

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Opportunistic exploitation: an overlooked pathway to extinction.
Trends Ecol Evol. 2013 Jul;28(7):409-13
Authors: Branch TA, Lobo AS, Purcell SW
Abstract
How can species be exploited economically to extinction? Past single-species hypotheses examining the economic plausibility of exploiting rare species have argued that the escalating value of rarity allows extinction to be profitable. We describe an alternative pathway toward extinction in multispecies exploitation systems, termed ‘opportunistic exploitation’. 

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Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Genotyping by sequencing resolves shallow population structure to inform conservation of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Authors: Wesley A. Larson, Lisa W. Seeb, Meredith V. Everett, Ryan K. Waples, William D. Templin, James E. Seeb. All authors but William D. Templin are from SAFS.

Here is a link to the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/eva.12128/suppinfo

Abstract

Recent advances in population genomics have made it possible to detect previously unidentified structure, obtain more accurate estimates of demographic parameters, and explore adaptive divergence, potentially revolutionizing the way genetic data are used to manage wild populations. 

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