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161 posts in Publications

When do multiple factors act together to endanger animal populations?

Animal populations are endangered when they face multiple human-caused pressures at the same time, especially if those pressures interact to worsen depletion. A new study shows that whether pressures interact to worsen overall pressure, or interact to reduce overall pressure, depends on how animal populations behave at low versus high densities. If the number of offspring that survive for each adult drops off slowly as populations increase, this can unexpectedly lead to trouble, since it is more likely that individual pressures will interact to make things worse. 

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New advice on how to better estimate maximum sustainable yield for fisheries

A major component of fisheries management is using highly complex computer models to figure out the highest catch that can be taken from a fish population—the so-called Maximum Sustainable Yield, or MSY. A critical assumption underlying MSY estimates is how to model the relation between total amount of spawning fish and the resulting offspring that they produce. A new paper by SAFS director André Punt and NOAA researcher Jason Cope examines a wide range of these models to find the best three-parameter version that can independently estimate both the amount of spawning fish and the fishing harvest rate that will produce MSY, concluding that the Ricker-Power model is the best. 

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The power of entire DNA sequences to secure the future of seafood

A new review of the contribution of genomics to seafood management reveals how new questions may be addressed by genetics. Genomics involves sequencing the complete DNA of organisms, which has a great variety of applications, including greatly enhancing our ability to define management units, tracing whether seafood is being labelled correctly when sold, identifying how often salmon stray from their streams of origin, detecting seafood diseases, and measuring the extent of fisheries-induced evolution. 

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Estuaries function better with natural patterns of water flow and suspended organic matter

A new study looks at clams and mussels in five estuaries in Puget Sound, and finds that alterations to river flow, landscape connectivity among adjacent habitat types, or the type and supply of suspended organic matter (detritus), can disrupt food webs at the scale of entire landscapes. Clams and mussels, which cannot move to track food sources, are particularly affected by climate variability, levee systems, water diversion from estuaries, and dwindling availability of detritus due to loss of tidal marsh wetlands. 

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Fisheries can alter the timing of spawning and migration in fish

Fishing can substantially alter when fish migrate and when they breed, says a new review in Fish and Fisheries by SAFS student Michael Tillotson and faculty member Thomas Quinn. For example, fishing closures may increase fishing on late breeders, resulting in a greater proportion of early breeders in the population. Such changes can exacerbate the effects of climate-driven changes in the timing of migration and breeding. 

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Conservation challenges of predator recovery

A new article, titled “Conservation challenges of predator recovery”, has been accepted for publication into Conservation Letters: A journal for the Society for Conservation Biology.  This article is a result of the collaboration of SAFS post-doc Kristin Marshall, SMEA Professor Ryan Kelly, NOAA scientist and SAFS affiliate faculty Eric Ward, and NOAA scientists Jameal Samhouri and Adrian Stier.
Abstract
Predators are critical components of ecosystems. 

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Oceanography and life history predict contrasting genetic population structure in two Antarctic fish species.

Oceanography and life history predict contrasting genetic population structure in two Antarctic fish species.
Evol Appl. 2015 Jun;8(5):486-509
Authors: Young EF, Belchier M, Hauser L, Horsburgh GJ, Meredith MP, Murphy EJ, Pascoal S, Rock J, Tysklind N, Carvalho GR
Abstract
Understanding the key drivers of population connectivity in the marine environment is essential for the effective management of natural resources. Although several different approaches to evaluating connectivity have been used, they are rarely integrated quantitatively. 

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Practical science communication strategies for graduate students.

Related Articles

Practical science communication strategies for graduate students.
Conserv Biol. 2014 Oct;28(5):1225-35
Authors: Kuehne LM, Twardochleb LA, Fritschie KJ, Mims MC, Lawrence DJ, Gibson PP, Stewart-Koster B, Olden JD
Abstract
Development of skills in science communication is a well-acknowledged gap in graduate training, but the constraints that accompany research (limited time, resources, and knowledge of opportunities) make it challenging to acquire these proficiencies. 

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