John Skalski

  • Professor, SAFS
  • Adjunct Professor, Environmental & Forest Sciences

Research areas

Fish and wildlife populations have among the highest aesthetic, social, and economic value of all natural resources. Yet wild populations are among the most difficult to study and among the hardest to assess anthropogenic effects of human expansion and energy development.

My research interests are in assessing anthropogenic effects on wild populations by using carefully crafted field experiments, advanced demographic analysis, and modern advances in animal tagging studies. These efforts involve interdisciplinary teams of biologists, engineers, resource managers, and biometricians working collaboratively to resolve important and often very costly resource management programs. My research staff and I bring to the table, experimental and impact assessment experience, population modeling, demographic analysis, and over 30 years of experience analyzing complex environmental data.

Part of this approach is to lead the field by developing advanced statistical capabilities and software that improve the precision, cost effectiveness, and realism of animal tagging studies.

Prospective graduate students may email me about availability as a faculty advisor.


Courses


Areas of Expertise

  • Mark-recapture theory
  • Statistical population reconstruction
  • Impact assessment theory
  • Analysis of complex environmental data
  • Salmonid life history analysis
  • Wildlife population dynamics

Community Engagement and Awards

Community Engagement

  •  Chelan County Public Utility District, statistical guidance on juvenile and adult salmonid survival studies, inseason forecasts for juvenile salmonid passage
  • Douglas County Public Utility District, basin-wide monitoring of salmonid production
  • Grant County Public Utility District, statistical guidance on salmonid survival studies
  • City of Seattle, statistical guidance on adult salmon surveys on the Cedar River
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, statistical guidance on salmonid survival compliance studies on the Columbia/Snake River
  • Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, guidance on the use of CBR-developed parameter estimation software
  • Yakama Nation, guidance on the use of CBR-developed parameter estimation software
  • Nez Perce Tribe, guidance on the use of CBR-developed parameter estimation software

Awards

  • 2013 Outstanding Monograph Award, The Wildlife Society

Selected publications