Gordon Holtgrieve set to speak at “The Future of Food” 2019 Engineering Lecture Series

By 2050, Earth’s population is estimated to reach nine billion. This will intensify a growing food security crisis, which is already exacerbated by current agricultural processes, climate change and economic inequality. Around the globe, there is an urgent need to improve the safety, efficiency and sustainability of the food supply chain.

This fall the University of Washington’s annual engineering lecture series will feature three UW engineers and scientists who are working across disciplines to manage the quality and quantity of the food we eat and grow. Their lectures — on developing technology to help farmers, studying how arsenic affects food and water quality, and analyzing how dams in rivers impact fish — are free and open to the public, but seating is limited and registration is required.

With new hydropower dams expected to disrupt the natural water flow of the Mekong River, Gordon Holtgrieve is working in Cambodia to uncover how the nutritional quality and quantity of fish will be affected. Mark Stone/University of Washington
With new hydropower dams expected to disrupt the natural water flow of the Mekong River, Gordon Holtgrieve is working in Cambodia to uncover how the nutritional quality and quantity of fish will be affected. Mark Stone/University of Washington

This year’s lecture series will close on Nov. 7, in Kane Hall 130 SAFS with SAFS associate professor Gordon Holtgrieve. Holtgrieve is an ecosystem ecologist and fisheries scientist whose research spans the Puget Sound area, Alaska and the Mekong River in Southeast Asia. He will talk about his work in the Mekong River basin to address how energy policy, watershed hydrology and ecosystems interact in order to lessen the effects of climate change and new infrastructure in rivers around the globe.

Register now to ensure you get a seat for Holtgrieve’s lecture – Floods, fish and people: Challenges and opportunities in the Mekong River basin

###

All lectures are free and start at 7:30 p.m. Advance registration, either online or by calling 206-543-0540, is required. All lectures will be broadcast at a later date on UWTV.

 

Back to Top